Disability in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Rethinking Disability Essay

Close your eyes for a day. Do not speak for a day. Sit for a day. Wouldn’t your social interaction be compromised? This articles talks about how people with disabilities are usually more limited by the social, cultural and economic constrains rather than by their actual disability. The author attributes this phenomenon to three different categories: 1) causality, 2) valued and devalued attributes, and 3) anticipated adult status. Additionally, he makes reference to the economic factor and how it influences the perception of society regarding people with disability.

Lastly he mentions how Heath-care professionals and leaders of the Global Disability Rights movement have a responsibility to shift the social and cultural perception society holds towards people with disability. Response Paper The article uses the following three categories to explain the social and cultural behavior when interacting with people who have a disability: 1) causality 2) valued and devalued attributes, and 3) anticipated adult status. Casually, refers the reason why an individual has a disability.

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The most common explanations throughout history are o divine displeasure, witchcraft or evil spirits, reincarnation, tainted blood, and genetics. Considering the medical advances made over the past decades, generally there is a unanimous consent when trying to explain what causes a disability; because of this, casually does not have the same influential impact as the other categories, however it. However, understanding the past interpretations of disability courses, helps enrich the explanation of why present cultures tried people with disabilities the way they do.

Valued and devalued attributes refers to what society finds important. The United States’ society for example, put a lot of enfaces in appearance, the physicality; thus a person in a wheelchair is more at a social disadvantage. However, in places where intellectual activity tends to have more value, these individuals normally have an advantage because they normally gravitated towards literary. Technology, for example, is a very important amongst the Asian countries, thus companies tend to search for people with disabilities to work with.

Lastly the final category is the anticipated adult status. This category focuses on the social estimate of the adult role that a person with disability could ultimately achieve. The United Nations estimates that only 3% of all those in need of rehabilitative care actually receive any treatment. Additionally, UNESCO estimates that the global literacy rate for those with disability is 3%; for women with disability, this figure is near 1%. The most common form of employment for individuals with disability worldwide is begging.

This demonstrates how the anticipated adult status worldwide is very low and how it does have a significant influence in the resources provided. I agree that these categories have a significant impact on the social interaction towards people with disability; however I do not believe these are the only factors. History, for example has a direct influence in the resources the government provides. Examining Mexico vs. the United States we can see that the United States has a larger history of war, thus tends to provide more resources because a lot of soldiers return with disabilities.

In Mexico, war is not to common, thus resources for people with disability are not a priority. Finally the author mentions that Heath-care professionals and leaders of the Global Disability Rights movement have a responsibility to shift the social and cultural perception society holds towards people with disability; this because in many counties they have a significant influence over policies regarding people with disabilities.

Although this might be true, I also believe that students have significant power to determine the future social relationships, this because they are the ones establishing the future social perspectives. Overall I believe it was a great article. It very clearly demonstrated the different social values and perspectives among cultures; all this illustrating a holistic cross cultural interaction. Groce, N. E. “ScienceDirect – The Lancet : Disability in Cross-cultural Perspective: Rethinking Disability. ” The Lance 354 (1999): 756-57. ScienceDirect – Home. Elsevier Ltd. , 21 Sept. 1999. Web. 08 Nov. 2011. .