Should public education in California enhance the quality of the curriculum for its gifted children? Essay

Working Thesis: Public education in California is not doing enough for its gifted children in the K-12 system and needs to improve the curriculum for those children.
One of the problems being faced in the world today is the problem of coping with the gifted children which are also refer to as whiz kids. These gifted children tend to surpass the drafted curriculum even before the average students wake up from their dreams.
This research paper would discuss if it would be idea for a public education in California to enhance the quality of the curriculum for its gifted children.

Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlGifted education is special education. One of the mandates of special education laws (IDEA, 1990) is that exceptional students should be placed in the least restrictive environment. Any setting, including the regular classroom, that prevents a child from receiving an appropriate education is not the least restrictive environment for that child. When applying these standards to the gifted and talented, educators must consider that the least restrictive environment for the advanced learner moves away from the regular classroom. Advanced learners need learning experiences designed to fit them and teachers who can monitor the match between learner and learning. Differentiated instruction is a method of accommodating the diverse needs of all students in the regular classroom. This approach to instruction creates an environment that maximizes student capabilities, and requires teachers to define challenge and growth differently in response to students’ varying interest and readiness levels. By differentiating the curricular elements (content, process, and product) teachers can present different approaches to what students learn, how the learn it, and how they demonstrate what they’ve learned.

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All policy statements approved by the National Association for Gifted Children Begin Match to source 2 in source list: http://www.nagc.org/NSBA/Acceleration.PDFBoard of Directors are consistent with the organization’s belief that education in a democracy must respect the uniqueness of all individuals, the broad range of cultural diversity present in our society, and the similarities and differences in learning characteristics that can be found within any group of students. NAGC is fully committed to national goals that advocate both excellence and equity for all students, and we believe that the best way to achieve these goals is through differentiated educational opportunities, resources, and encouragement for all students.End Match
Historically, in 1972 Commissioner of Education Sidney P. Marland, Jr., published the results of a nationwide study mandated Begin Match to source 6 in source list: http://star.xq23.com/education/ed262519__Gifted_Students.htmlby the U. S.End Match Congress. Designed Begin Match to source 6 in source list: http://star.xq23.com/education/ed262519__Gifted_Students.htmlto determine theEnd Match degree Begin Match to source 6 in source list: http://star.xq23.com/education/ed262519__Gifted_Students.htmlto whichEnd Match our most able students were being served in the nation’s schools, the Marland Report Begin Match to source 4 in source list: http://echthros.netdefined gifted and talented students as “those identified by professionally qualified persons who by virtue of outstanding abilities are capable of high performance.”End Match The Marland Report, recognized as a landmark study that made a significant impact on the nation, stressed the importance of recognizing diverse types of giftedness and talent. This study identified six areas in which high potential might be manifested: Begin Match to source 5 in source list: Robinson, Ann Clinkenbeard, Pamela R.. general intellectual ability, specific academic aptitude, creative or productive thinking, leadership ability, visual and performing arts, and psychomotor ability.End Match However, in Begin Match to source 5 in source list: Robinson, Ann Clinkenbeard, Pamela R.. theEnd Match years that have elapsed since the Begin Match to source 9 in source list: Assouline, Susan G. Nicpon, Megan Foley . release of the Marland Report,End Match the term Begin Match to source 9 in source list: Assouline, Susan G. Nicpon, Megan Foley . “giftedEnd Match and talented” has most often been used to imply the possession of either high intellectual potential or high academic achievement. In an effort to encourage the recognition and nurturance of a diversity of abilities, the term gifted and talented is used within this standards document to include the breadth of current thinking on the nature of giftedness.
Marland further reported Begin Match to source 3 in source list: Weinfeld, Rich Barnes-Robinson, Linda Je. that gifted and talentedEnd Match students Begin Match to source 3 in source list: Weinfeld, Rich Barnes-Robinson, Linda Je. “require differentiatedEnd Match educational Begin Match to source 3 in source list: Weinfeld, Rich Barnes-Robinson, Linda Je. programs and/End Matchor Begin Match to source 3 in source list: Weinfeld, Rich Barnes-Robinson, Linda Je. services beyond those normally provided by the regular school program in order to realize their contribution to self and society.”End Match This requirement was reaffirmed by Begin Match to source 7 in source list: (4-29-03) http://www.tenet.edu/teks/math/progdev/nctmpromising.htmlthe passage of the JavitsEnd Match Bill for Begin Match to source 7 in source list: (4-29-03) http://www.tenet.edu/teks/math/progdev/nctmpromising.htmlgifted and talentedEnd Match programs and its re- authorization in 1994.
Since its inception, the National Association for Gifted Children has consistently acknowledged the existence of a diverse scope of extraordinary abilities in all populations and emphasized the need to develop and nurture all expressions of giftedness. In keeping with this philosophy, the NAGC Professional Development Division has endeavored to identify personal and professional competencies that are essential to the successful development of giftedness, and the specific concepts and skills that should be included in programs designed to prepare personnel for diverse roles in the field of gifted and talented education.
Looking at all the points of the National Association of Gifted Children, it could be seen that the improve in the curriculum of public school for gifted children would be a must because presently in the Western world we now see chaps of 11 years obtaining PhDs and these were only possible because they were giving the chance of developing ahead of others because they have the inborn talents and traits that would take them ahead of others.
All persons are entitled to educational opportunities designed to maximize their potential. In order to serve as role models for their students, teachers should demonstrate integrity, empathy, and respect for students and their differences. All students should be served by self-confident professionals who are committed to lifelong learning and who communicate effectively with students of all ability levels and from all populations. Effective teachers should be creative, flexible, and willing to take intellectual and creative risks.
There are common elements that must be included in the educational programs designed for all students. These include critical and creative thinking, development of healthy self-concepts, interpersonal communication skills, cultural appreciation, and personal initiative. Where there is excellence in general education, gifted education will more likely flourish; where gifted education flourishes, there is increased potential for excellence in general education. The potential for giftedness exists in all populations and in a variety of contexts. Giftedness must be recognized, developed and nurtured if it is to flourish. Individuals with extraordinary potential are capable of perceiving and conceptualizing more complex ideas and issues, and responding in more complex ways, than the majority of their age peers. In order to achieve personal excellence and Begin Match to source 8 in source list: http://www.lynchburg.orgrealize theirEnd Match potential Begin Match to source 8 in source list: http://www.lynchburg.orgcontributions to self and society, studentsEnd Match with exceptional potential must be provided with appropriate educational opportunities. Educational services for these students must be commensurate with their unique developmental and academic levels; Qualitatively differentiated in depth, breadth, pace, and intensity from those that are appropriate and available in the general curriculum; and provided by actively-involved professionals with specialized preparation on the nature and needs of individuals with extraordinary potential.
Since we all know gifted children are sort of genius from God, it would be better if the California public school can improve her curriculum with the following guidelines which are suitable in teaching a gifted child: 1. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlEmploy a superior teacher.End Match
2. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlFind out what they already know. Assess their level of achievement,
and determine competencies and areas of deficiency.End Match
3. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlGive them credit for concepts they have mastered.End Match
4. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlDon’t have them repeat content work just because its the curriculum
or because its there. Employ differentiated curriculum methods.End Match
5. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlProvide new and different challenging activities for them to do
instead of drill- and-practice or grade level work. Provide opportunities for them to work with complex and abstract ideas.End Match

6. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlCapitalize on interests. Find out what their interests are and build
projects around their interests.End Match
7. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlUse curriculum compacting and allow them some flexibility in the way
they spend the time “bought back” because they have mastered a concept.End Match

8. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlAllow them to learn at a faster pace than their age peers.End Match
9. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlUse discovery learning techniques and inquiry methods; avoid teacher
dominated methods.End Match
10. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlTrust them to learn in nontraditional ways; guide and lead them in
learning differently.End Match
11. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlHelp them to find other advanced learners. Never judge their social
skills solely on the way they interact with their age peers.End Match
12. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlThrill them with many, varied, challenging and engaging choices.End Match
13. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlFocus on higher order thinking skills.End Match
14. Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlGive them lots of experience with setting their own goals and
evaluating their own work.End Match

With the points and references made in previous pages, it would be highly sensible for Public Schools in California to improve the curriculum of their gifted children so that it wouldn’t be like the case of burying undeveloped talents instead of developing it. And who knows whether the gifted children in California public schools would be the ones to rule the world come next generation. Though this can only be possible if their curriculum is improved.
Sources Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlTeaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom, Free Spirit Publishing Inc., MN, 1992.)End Match By Winebrenner, Susan.
Begin Match to source 1 in source list: http://www.misd.net/gifted/teaching.htmlHow to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms, ASCD, 1995)End Match by Tomlinson, Carol Ann.
The National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) homepage.